Fitzpatrick introduces Puppy Protection Act

The legislation is meant to provide better protection for puppies by improving standards for federally licensed commercial dog breeders

The Times

U.S. Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick, Charlie Crist, Guy Reschenthaler and Jim McGovern introduced the Puppy Protection Act to provide better protection for puppies by improving standards for federally licensed commercial dog breeders.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture regulates federally licensed commercial dog breeders that sell dogs wholesale to retail pet stores and commercial brokers, or directly to consumers over the internet under the Animal Welfare Act. While the Animal Welfare Act is meant to ensure dogs in federally licensed facilities are treated humanely, the current regulations fall far short, according to bill sponsors. The Puppy Protection Act creates stronger standards for veterinary care, housing, breeding practices and specific standards for socialization and placement of retired breeding dogs.

The Puppy Protection Act will not impact family pets, livestock or hobbyist breeders.

“We envision a day when a puppy will never again find her paws and legs trapped in the wire flooring of a stacked cage at a puppy mill. The Puppy Protection Act will strengthen baseline standards of care that must be provided by large commercial dog breeders,” said Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund. “Thank you to the leadership of Reps. Fitzpatrick, Crist, McGovern and Reschenthaler for introducing this important bipartisan measure to improve the living conditions of dogs and puppies. We will fight to support its passage.”